The Internet Archive - www.archive.org

Information is often removed from the world wide web and it cannot be found at the URL address on which it was previously located. Often, this information is not lost forever, or secretly hidden, as chances are it can be found on the website www.archive.org. Amongst the huge store of information contained there are electronic copies of Irish language dictionaries.

Foclóir Gaeidhilge agus Béarla / An Irish-English Dictionary

Published in Dublin in 1904.

It is an Irish-English dictionary.

Number of pages: 803. There are two prefaces from pages iii to xiii. Abbreviations are explained on pages xv and xvi.

The Irish words are printed in Gaelic font and the English words are printed in Roman font.

This was the first dictionary Dineen compiled. It is not the same as the larger dictionary he produced in 1927. It is shorter than that dictionary, but it is still a large dictionary with many many headwords. There is grammatical information as well as errata at the back of the dictionary.

The dictionary is full to the brim with idiomatic phrases. One particular example is ‘Do stracadh i gcéin ar urla’. This means “who was dragged far from home by the hair of the head.” All sorts of people are described in the dictionary such as a ‘Breallóg’a graceless, awkward woman; ‘Breallsún’an awkward clown. This dictionary is quite a read.

Lane’s English-Irish Dictionary

Compiled by Timothy O’Neill Lane

Published in Dublin in 1904.

Number of pages: 581. There is a preface and other information between pages v and xv.

The English headwords are printed in Roman font and the Irish words are printed in Gaelic font. Both fonts are clear and easy to read.

This dictionary is bursting with Irish words. The author attempted to offer Irish words for modern objects so that Irish would be suitable for modern life. ‘Postman’ he translated as Teachtaire Litreach.

Take the entry for Elephant. Trod is given, and used in the sample phrase Trod do dhéanamh do chuil .i. mórán do dhéanamh do nídh shuarach. (To make an elephant of a fly i.e. make a mountain out of a molehill.) Sometimes, unfortunately, he failed to translate or find a suitable Irish word for an English word. One such example is ‘stationery’. He left it as páipéir, dubh, céir 7rl. (paper, ink, wax, etc.) He explained what stationery is, rather than providing a translation of the word.

English-Irish Phrase Dictionary

Written by Lambert McKenna

Published in Dublin in 1911.

Number of pages: 285. There is a two page preface.

It is an English-Irish dictionary.

The English words are printed in Roman font and the Irish words are printed in Gaelic font.

The objective the editor had as he compiled this dictionary was to produce a dictionary full of native phrases for students learning Irish so that they could learn the best Irish phrases. It is not only the English words that are translated; sample phrases are provided for the reader along with the headings so that the reader could use the word correctly in a sentence. For the heading ‘Abuse’, these sample phrases can be found. ‘She abused me’‘Do thug sí drochchainnt dom; do spídigh sí mé; do thug sí aghaidh a béil orm; do thug sí aghaidh na muc agus na madraí orm; do thug sí íde a teangan, íde na madraí orm.’

This dictionary is full of great phrases.

Larger English-Irish Dictionary – Timothy O’Neill Lane

Published in Dublin in 1917.

Number of pages: 1748. There is a preface and other information between pages vii and xiv.

This is an English-Irish dictionary.

The English words are printed in Roman font and the Irish words are printed in Gaelic font. Both fonts are very clear.

This dictionary is an expansion of the dictionary Lane published in 1904. It is a large dictionary with much information contained within.

The Educational Pronouncing Dictionary of the Irish Language

Written by Séamus Ó Duirinne and Pádraig Ó Dálaigh

It in an Irish-English dictionary.

Number of pages: 197. There is a preface and other information from pages vii to xx. There is information about how to address people and sign letters on pages 198 and 199.

The Irish words are printed in Gaelic font. The English words ae printed in Roman font. Both fonts are very clear and easy to read. It was published in the 1930s.

Learner’s Dictionary

Written by Pádraig Ó Siochfhradha (An Seabhac)

Published by The Educational Company of Ireland (which is still in existence), in 1959.

There are 108 pages in this dictionary. The abbreviations are explained on page 109. Grammatical information is to be found on pages 110 to 121.

The English words are printed in Roman font and the Irish words are printed in Gaelic font. The two fonts are clear and legible.

Remarks:

This dictionary was compiled for students learning Irish at school. It is a short dictionary but it is an useful dictionary. Irish translations are provided for common English words. The fact that this dictionary is still in print today (see below) shows how good and useful this dictionary is.

Some of the Irish words are no longer in use. The Terminological Committee / An Coiste Téarmaíochta created new words for certain objects in the years after this dictionary was published. Cianamharcaíocht is the word used for television in the dictionary. It is a lovely Irish word and fully rooted in Irish vocabulary. Unfortunately, if cianamharcaíocht were used today, almost no one would understand it.

Caution! Be aware that certain words in English have changed their meanings over the years. If you search for the word browsing in this dictionary, you will find iníor and fosaíocht. Believe it or not, browsing originally meant to chew the cud, or the way cattle graze grass. If the word iníor were used in an essay or report dealing with the world wide web, no one would understand it. Ag cúrsáil an ghréasáin – that is the best way to say browsing the web in Irish. See focal.ie - browsing

By the way...

There is a new version of the dictionary (2005) available from www.litriocht.com

How to find a word?

There is a search box on the upper right hand side of the screen. Type the word you want to find into the box and then press Go. The results appear in the panel beneath the search box. The words found will be highlighted in blue. If it is difficult to read the page, the page can be magnified by pressing the plus (+) and minus (-) in the upper left corner.

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